Guide To Etiquette And Behavior For Working With Persons With Disabilities


 
Supplement for Special Education 205
Introduction to Serving Students with Special Needs
(Instructor: Thomas E. Grayson)
Guide To Etiquette And Behavior
For Working With Persons With Disabilities

 
 



The following summary contains many true statements, but no absolute truths. Every person with a disability is different. While this summary is about disabilities, you are working with individuals who have disabilities. So, all of the following guidelines are valid until someone with a disability tells you that they want it done in some other way. With this in mind, the following general guidelines are offered:

Disability - Blind and/or Visually Impaired

Things to Know:
 


Things to Do:
 


Things to Avoid:
 


Things to Consider:
 


Disability - Deaf and/or Hearing Impaired

Things to Know:


Things to Do:

Find out how the person best communicates.

If the person uses an interpreter, address the person, not the interpreter.

If the person reads lips, speak in a normal, not exaggerated way. Short, simple sentences are best.

If the person lip-reads, avoid blocking their view of your face. Make sure the lighting is good.

Gain their attention before starting a conversation.

 If there is some doubt in your mind whether they understood you correctly, rephrase your statement and ask them if you have been understood.

Be aware of situations where a person may be waiting for a service (transportation, a table, the start of an activity) where the common way to communicate is an announcement or the calling of the personís name. Make sure you take notes when someone cannot hear you and develop an alternative way of notifying them.


Things to Avoid:
 


Things to Consider:
 


Disability - Uses Wheelchair

Things to Know:
 


Things to Do:
 


Things to Avoid:
 


Things to Consider:
 


Disability - Conditions Which Cause Difficulty with Speech

Things to Know:
 


Things to Do:
 


Things to Avoid:
 


Things to Consider: